Processes for Sustaining Energy in Noncertified Historic Buildings

Abstract

This paper addresses energy efficiency, indoor air quality, and water consumption in historical buildings. Building sustainability of historical buildings has become a world-wide issue along with all types of buildings from new construction to existing buildings.  Historic buildings makeup a large part of existing buildings throughout the world making it essential that research is done to provide these buildings with sustainable options.  The areas of special concerns in renovating historical buildings are improving indoor environmental quality, indoor air quality, water efficiency, and energy efficiency while maintaining the historical value of these buildings.  This paper presents case studies from four historic buildings in Metro Atlanta, Georgia.  The study includes, 1) field verification and existing condition assessment of the thermal comfort, energy consumption, indoor air quality, and natural lighting levels of the four case study buildings. 2) Building Information Modeling was used to simulate energy performance of the buildings as well as determining the CO2 footprint. These models were calibrated and verified against field readings.  3) the simulation models were used to generate design and renovation alternatives to improve the energy efficiency of these buildings as well as reducing the CO2 footprint and water consumption without impacting the originality of these buildings.  This study will provide general design guidelines and renovation options for historical buildings to reduce energy consumption and creating a smaller carbon footprint while maintaining the authenticity of the buildings.

Presented By

Jacqueline Stephens, MSCM, LEED BD&C, O&M
Assistant Professor
Kennesaw State University

Jacqueline F. Stephens taught construction management at Westwood College until 2016 when she became an Assistant Professor at Kennesaw State University in Marietta, Georgia.  She is currently working on her Ph.D. in Technology Management specializing in Construction Management.  Her interests are in historical building preservation and sustainability.